Have You Been the Scapegoat or Taken the Blame When Things Took a Turn at the Office?

English: job office

An executive worker (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

In a recent survey, 30% of senior managers interviewed said they have accepted the blame in the office for something that wasn’t their fault. More than one-third (34 percent) who took the fall reported they did so because they felt indirectly responsible for the problem, while more than one-quarter (28 percent) revealed they just didn’t want to get others in trouble.

Managers were asked, “Have you ever taken the blame at work for something that wasn’t your fault?” Their responses:

Yes 30%
No 70%
100%

Managers who responded “yes” also were asked, Which of the following best describes why you took the blame at work for something that wasn’t your fault? Their responses:

Felt indirectly responsible for the problem 34%
Didn’t want to get others in trouble 28%
It was a minor infraction that wasn’t worth arguing over 25%
An explanation would have been more trouble than it was worth 12%
Don’t know/no answer 2%
101%*
*Responses do not total 100 percent due to rounding.

While it is important to accept responsibility when you’ve made a mistake at work, sometimes executives may feel compelled to take the blame for something they did not do. Depending on the infraction, being the scapegoat may only serve to hurt an executive’s reputation. To that end, OfficeTeam offers five tips for navigating the blame game at work:

  1. Admit when you’re wrong. It’s better to acknowledge a mistake you’ve made than to try to deny it, cover things up or shift the blame. Others may find it easier to forgive and forget if you come clean from the get-go.
  2. Move on. When something goes wrong, don’t get wrapped up in pointing fingers. Focus on what should be done to resolve the issue and avoid similar problems in the future.
  3. Don’t always be the fall guy (or girl). It’s understandable for employees to cover for a colleague from time to time, but try not to make a habit of it. The individual who made the error may continue to make mistakes, and you will be the one whose job could be at risk.
  4. Keep everyone honest. Make sure expectations are clearly outlined for every project. Document each person’s responsibilities and contributions so there’s accountability.
  5. Give credit where it’s due. Acknowledge colleagues for their accomplishments and call attention to group successes. Make sure you’re also getting the recognition you deserve by providing status reports to your manager.

Follow the Magazine:
https://businessleadershipmanagement.wordpress.com/subscribe-follow-the-magazine/
(After you have filled in your email address in the column at the right hand side of the screen, a confirmation email will sent to your email address. You will have to confirm it before subscription begins)

Follow us on Twitter:
https://twitter.com/BusinessLeaders

Like us on Facebook:
https://www.facebook.com/BusinessLeadershipManagement

**As part of the Magazine’s drive to reward subscribers/followers, we will be providing subscribers/followers special access to exclusive content which will not be otherwise available to normal visitors. Please be sure to subscribe to the Magazine. Many visitors have given us positive comments that they will be bookmarking the site, but as the system is unable to capture a working email address to which the passcodes for exclusive content will be sent, they will miss out on this content. Do note that passcodes are locked to each exclusive content, not a one-for-all access, so do provide a working email address that you check regularly so as not to miss out on them!
Advertisements

4 thoughts on “Have You Been the Scapegoat or Taken the Blame When Things Took a Turn at the Office?

    • Thanks for the reblog, do follow the Magazine for more insights!

      best,
      J.CJ (MBA), Editor, BLM

      Follow the Magazine:

      https://businessleadershipmanagement.wordpress.com/subscribe-follow-the-magazine/

      (After you have filled in your email address in the column at the right hand side of the screen, a confirmation email will sent to your email address. You will have to confirm it before subscription begins)

      Follow us on Twitter:

      https://twitter.com/BusinessLeaders

      Like us on Facebook:

      https://www.facebook.com/BusinessLeadershipManagement

      **As part of the Magazine’s drive to reward subscribers/followers, we will be providing subscribers/followers special access to exclusive content which will not be otherwise available to normal visitors. Please be sure to subscribe to the Magazine. Many visitors have given us positive comments that they will be bookmarking the site, but as the system is unable to capture a working email address to which the passcodes for exclusive content will be sent, they will miss out on this content. Do note that passcodes are locked to each exclusive content, not a one-for-all access, so do provide a working email address that you check regularly so as not to miss out on them!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s