Majority of Employees Complain They Have Experienced Conflict in Their Job

Conflict a workplace
© Photographer: Nyul | Agency: Dreamstime.com

One fifth of workers rate the fracas they encountered at work as ‘very serious’

According to a survey conducted by FindEmployment, 74% of employees report they have experienced conflict during the course of their career.  43% of respondents rated the conflict as ‘minor’; with 37% stating the strife was ‘Medium’ and one fifth (20%) noting they had experienced ‘very serious’ conflict at work. The majority of employees have clashed with a colleague, with almost half (46%) admitting they have had a fight with a co-worker. 17 out of every one hundred workers have had a battle with their boss, and a rather surprising 14% have exchanged heated words with a client of their company.

When questioned as to who instigated the conflict, a large number of respondents blamed their co-worker for the argument (39%). Almost one fifth (19%) accuse their boss as being the cause of the disagreement. 12% insist it was their clients fault, with only 9 out of every one hundred surveyed admitting that they bore responsibility for the confrontation.

A minor disagreement was identified as the most common event that led to the argument with 28% of those surveyed. Almost a quarter (24%) noted that work related stress was the biggest contributing factor to the conflict they experienced. 18 out of every hundred employees cited a continuously hostile working environment as the trigger for their battle. 12% believe an accumulation of previous tensions contributed to the aggression.

‘The demands of the modern job market mean that employees are often working long hours under stressful conditions for many different reasons, such as fear of losing their jobs during a recession, or to meet deadlines to ensure their company stays competitive”, said James Weaver, Director of FindEmployment. “It is natural that managers and co-workers will clash occasionally, but it is important to find a more constructive outlet for tension or stress that does not result in aggression in the workplace. Ultimately managers should establish practices and policies in their company to limit the buildup of pressure for all parties involved including themselves,” he added.

 

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